Brain Aneurysm: Symptoms

From a Distance by Bette Midler.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLHE9jrb_N4

I remember having a constant headache for 2 days or so prior to the rapture. The pain wasn’t overwhelming and I could tolerate it. I would rate it a 2 on the scale of 1-10 with 10 being the worst. New mothers, me being one of them, tend to ignore little things that their bodies are trying to communicate. We give excuses in order to make ourselves feel better. It is very true we are tired most of the time with little to no adequate rest most of the time. We prioritize the needs of our children and our loved ones. The question that still ponders my mind is – ‘was the aneurysm ruptured already prior to my hospital admission and the bleeding just got worse or did it rapture on that hectic night?’ The doctors that I have met with haven’t given me a conclusive answer yet. They tend to say…..in so many words——“we just don’t know”

So what are the actual symptoms of a brain aneurysm?

Please do not sit and start guessing what could be wrong with you or your loved one. Get emergency care if you suddenly get an intensely painful headache, lose consciousness, or have some of these other symptoms of an aneurysm that has ruptured: I cannot emphasize enough to you how critical it is to get that medical care urgently. Get help if you think something is wrong with your body. DO NOT WAIT.

Although brain aneurysms usually don’t show symptoms, they can press on the brain and nerves as they get bigger. See a doctor at once if you’re having the following symptoms of an unruptured aneurysm:

  • Headache
  • Dilated pupils
  • Blurred or double vision
  • Pain above and behind an eye
  • Drooping eyelid
  • Hard time speaking
  • Weakness and numbness in one side of your face

Please remember that no matter what you are going through or how things turn out, you are not alone. God is with you and He has everything under control. He will lead you to where you need be at the right time. He will bring the right people to your case. God is watching us from a distance. You are a very special child of Him. Have faith and trust in nothing else but in Him. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLHE9jrb_N4

Brain Aneurysm: Risk Factors/causes

Brain aneurysms/cerebral aneurysms form when the walls of the arteries in the brain become thin and weaken.  Aneurysms typically form at branch points in arteries because these sections are the weakest.  Occasionally, cerebral aneurysms may be present from birth, usually resulting from an abnormality in an artery wall. Reference          

Risk factors for developing an aneurysm

Sometimes cerebral aneurysms are the result of inherited risk factors, including:

  • genetic connective tissue disorders that weaken artery walls
  • polycystic kidney disease (in which numerous cysts form in the kidneys)
  • arteriovenous malformations (snarled tangles of arteries and veins in the brain that disrupt blood flow.  Some AVMs develop sporadically, or on their own.)
  • history of aneurysm in a first-degree family member (child, sibling, or parent).

Other risk factors develop over time and include:

  • untreated high blood pressure
  • cigarette smoking
  • drug abuse, especially cocaine or amphetamines, which raise blood pressure to dangerous levels. Intravenous drug abuse is a cause of infectious mycotic aneurysms.
  • age over 40.

Less common risk factors include:

  • head trauma
  • brain tumor
  • infection in the arterial wall (mycotic aneurysm).

Additionally, high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, diabetes, and high cholesterol puts one at risk of atherosclerosis (a blood vessel disease in which fats build up on the inside of artery walls), which can increase the risk of developing a fusiform aneurysm.

Risk factors for an aneurysm to rupture

Not all aneurysms will rupture.  Aneurysm characteristics such as size, location, and growth during follow-up evaluation may affect the risk that an aneurysm will rupture. In addition, medical conditions may influence aneurysm rupture.

Risk factors include:

  • Smoking.  Smoking is linked to both the development and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. Smoking may even cause multiple aneurysms to form in the brain.
  • High blood pressure.  High blood pressure damages and weakens arteries, making them more likely to form and to rupture. 
  • Size.  The largest aneurysms are the ones most likely to rupture in a person who previously did not show symptoms.
  • Location.  Aneurysms located on the posterior communicating arteries (a pair of arteries in the back part of the brain) and possibly those on the anterior communicating artery (a single artery in the front of the brain) have a higher risk of rupturing than those at other locations in the brain.
  • Growth.  Aneurysms that grow, even if they are small, are at increased risk of rupture.
  • Family history.  A family history of aneurysm rupture suggests a higher risk of rupture for aneurysms detected in family members.
  • The greatest risk occurs in individuals with multiple aneurysms who have already suffered a previous rupture or sentinel bleed.

For my case, I had been diagnosed with high blood pressure in the first trimester of my second pregnancy and the condition was being managed when I suffered the brain aneurysm. No family history of brain aneurysms that I am aware of. No smoking, no alcohol abuse, and absolutely no drug use except for the ones for BP and vitamins. My take from this is that we are all pretty much at risk. I have heard stories of completely healthy people, very athletic, and with no family history get them. The more information we know about brain aneurysms, the more lives we can help save.